millimeter wave

FCC Announcement Makes New Spectrum Available for Millimeter Wave

The FCC recently announced new spectrum for millimeter wave. The new rules open nearly 11 gigahertz of high-frequency spectrum for mobile and fixed wireless broadband, which include 3.85 GHz of currently licensed spectrum and 7 GHz of unlicensed spectrum. This decision could prove critical for the U.S. to retain its leadership in the field of wireless communications.

Dynamic Subarrays for Hybrid Precoding in Wideband mmWave Massive MIMO Systems

Hybrid analog/digital precoding can potentially achieve high spectral efficiencies while requiring less cost and power consumption than fully-digital solutions. This makes it an attractive candidate architecture for millimeter wave systems, which requires deploying large antenna arrays at both the transmitter and receiver to guarantee sufficient received signal power. Most of prior work though on hybrid precoding focuses on narrow-band channels and assumes a fully-connected hybrid architecture. MmWave systems, though, are expected to employ wideband with frequency selectivity.

Frequency Selective Hybrid Precoding in Millimeter Wave OFDMA Systems

Hybrid precoding, a combination of analog and digital precoding, is an attempt to reach a compromise between complexity and performance. By exploiting more than one radio frequency chain, hybrid precoding enables a millimeter wave (mmWave) system to take advantage of both spatial multiplexing and beamforming gain. A major challenge with hybrid precoding is its configuration in wideband systems because the analog beamforming weights should be the same across the entire band.

Initial Beam Association in Millimeter Wave Cellular Systems: Analysis and Design Insights

Wireless communication via millimeter wave (mmWave) frequencies is a key component of future cellular systems. mmWave deployments will use beamforming with large antenna arrays by both the base stations and mobile stations to ensure sufficient received signal power. Prior work on coverage and rate of mmWave cellular networks focused mainly on the case when base stations and mobile users beamfomring vectors are perfectly designed for maximum beamforming gains.

Millimeter wave wearable networks in crowded indoor environments

Mobile wearable computing devices are rapidly making inroads due to advancements in miniature electronics fabrication technology, mobile wireless communication, efficient batteries, and increasingly capable data analytics. The major driver of the mobile electronics market has been fitness and healthcare gadgets. Recently, a new class of high-end wearable devices has emerged with relaxed power constraints and high data rate requirements.

MmWave channel estimation using sub6-GHz channel information

Due to hardware constraints, millimeter wave (mmWave) channel is not directly accessible and hence estimating mmWave channel for beamforming is difficult. Further, sub-6 GHz and mmWave systems are envisioned to work together, so assuming the knowledge of sub-6 GHz channel is reasonable.  Hence, it is worthwhile to investigate how the channel at sub-6 GHz and mmWave relate. This is particularly important for high mobility scenarios like vehicular communication, where frequent beam-training results in significant overhead.
 

Waveform Design for Joint Millimeter Wave Communication and Radar

Surface transportation safety can be enhanced by the use of wireless technologies, mainly automotive radar and vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communication. Automotive radar provides a high-resolution low-latency approach for a continuous automatic detection and ranging of both communication-enabled and non-communication-enabled transportation users. V2V systems rely on the collaborative communication between vehicles to achieve a real-time cooperative detection and ranging.

Analysis of Urban Millimeter Wave Microcellular Networks

Millimeter wave networks are sensitive to blockages due to densely distributed buildings in urban areas. This is critical for vehicle-to-infrastructure networks, which are cellular networks designed to support emerging vehicular applications. Most popular pathloss models use only the Euclidean distance between the transmitter and the receiver to characterize the channel, but in urban environments where severe blockages caused by buildings is often encountered, Euclidean distance does not provide enough information to characterize the pathloss. 
 

Analysis of Interference Cancellation in mmWave Cellular Systems

In this research, WNCG visiting graduate student Amir Jafari, WNCG graduate student Jeonghun Park and WNCG professor Robert Heath address the benefits of interference cancellation in millimeter-wave (mmWave) cellular systems. Considering a multiple antenna communications system with transmitting and receiving antennas, the receiving antennas can either be exploited to decode data streams in order to achieve spatial multiplexing, or alternatively the receiving antennas can be used to cancel the interference.

Three WNCG Professors Awarded $1 Million for 5G Research

WNCG Profs. François Baccelli, Jeff Andrews and Robert Heath were recently awarded a $1,000,000 research grant from the National Science Foundation for research on Millimeter Wave (mmW) cellular networks. The project is entitled "Fundamental Properties of Millimeter Wave Networks: Signal, Interference, and Connectivity” and will develop new mathematical and analysis tools to uncover the potential of mmW cellular networks.

Subscribe to RSS - millimeter wave