WNCG

GDMS Joins WNCG Industrial Affiliate Program

Virginia-based company, General Dynamics Mission Systems (GDMS) recently joined the WNCG Industrial Affiliate Program as a level one member.

GDMS is a business unit of General Dynamics, the global aerospace and defense company and a leading provider of mission critical systems across land, sea, air, space and cyber domains. The company has a global presence in secure communications and networking, command and control systems, imagery sensors and cyber.

Alum Dimitris Papailiopoulos Joins UW-Madison Faculty

WNCG Alumnus, Dimitris Papailiopoulos, recently accepted a position as an Assistant Professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-Madison), where he will also serve as a faculty affiliate at the Wisconsin Institute for Discovery.

WNCG Receives Huawei Award for Best Collaboration

WNCG Profs. Gustavo de Veciana and Jeff Andrews recently received an award for Best Collaboration with the wireless group at Huawei. This international award goes to a funded university collaboration the company deems most impactful from among their offices and partner institutions worldwide.  

“We are very pleased to accept this award,” Prof. de Veciana states. “The experience of working with engineers at Huawei has been very rewarding and fun.”  

WNCG Alum Nasim Mohammadi Estakhri Receives IEEE Photonics Society Fellowship

WNCG alumna Nasim Mohammadi Estakhri recently received a Graduate Student Fellowship from the IEEE Photonics Society. The program provides fellowships to outstanding graduate students pursuing education within the society’s field of interest. The fellowship is usually awarded to a student who, at the time of nomination, are in their final year of graduate study.

Student Francesco Monticone Accepts Cornell Faculty Position

WNCG Graduate Student, and recent winner of the WNCG Student Leadership Award,   Francesco Monticone, recently accepted a position as an Assistant Professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Cornell University. Monticone received a BS and MS in Electronics Engineering from Politecnico di Torino in Italy, and is a member of Prof. Andrea Alù’s Metamaterials and Plasmonics Research Group. His research interests include applied electromagnetics, metamaterials, plasmonics and nanophotonics with applications ranging from microwaves to optical frequencies.

Early Bird Discount Registration Now Available for TWS 2016

On October 18, 2016, Texas Wireless Summit (TWS) will explore how automated vehicles will re-shape wireless over the next 10 years with their demands for coordinated sensing and decision-making. Reshaping Wireless through Automated Vehicles will look at the benefits and requirements of connectivity, the key challenges of vehicle sensing and shared data analytics, including lightly-processed radar, lidar and camera data. 

Analyzing Uplink Massive MIMO Using Stochastic Geometry

Massive multiple-input multiple-out (MIMO) is a promising technique for 5G cellular networks. Prior work showed that high throughput can be achieved with a large number of base station antennas through simple signal processing in massive MIMO networks. The performance of massive MIMO in a large-scale network with irregular base station locations and random user distributions is not yet fully understood.

Dynamic Subarrays for Hybrid Precoding in Wideband mmWave Massive MIMO Systems

Hybrid analog/digital precoding can potentially achieve high spectral efficiencies while requiring less cost and power consumption than fully-digital solutions. This makes it an attractive candidate architecture for millimeter wave systems, which requires deploying large antenna arrays at both the transmitter and receiver to guarantee sufficient received signal power. Most of prior work though on hybrid precoding focuses on narrow-band channels and assumes a fully-connected hybrid architecture. MmWave systems, though, are expected to employ wideband with frequency selectivity.

Forward Collision Vehicular RADAR with IEEE 802.11

The majority of automotive radar deployed in vehicles operates at the millimeter wave (mmWave) band. These devices, however, are susceptible to multiple security risks such as spoofing, which has severe implications for vehicular functions such as forward collision detection and avoidance. The project by Prof. Robert Heath Jr., former UT Research Scientist Dr. Bob Daniels, and student Enoch Yeh introduces a concept for enabling radar functions on traditional IEEE 802.11 devices, creating a joint framework for radar and communications.

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